1. WORK SAMPLES.

2. ARTISTIC CREDENTIALS.

3. SPEED.

4. PERFORMANCE CREDENTIALS.

5. PROFESSIONAL RECORD, REFERENCES OR TESTIMONIALS.

Back to "HOW TO HIRE" INTRO

Is the artist really an artist? If so, do they have a record of specializing in CARICATURE or CARTOON art?
Ask about their background, or to see a resume. Look for
strong evidence that they are indeed an artist, not just someone who has minimal drawing abilities. Have they
shown their work in galleries? Has it been published in major newspapers or magazines? Have they won any prestigious art awards? (Be careful on this one: only awards judged by juries which cannot be personally influenced by the artist should be counted. Many business associations, even the National Caricaturists Society, vote for friends at chummy annual social gatherings. In that case, you may learn something about the artist's lobbying skills or ability to win votes from friends, but that does not confirm their artistic qualifications.)
Then, even if they do pass muster as a bona fide artist, do they have any proof that they rate SPECIFICALLY as a caricature artist or cartoonist? Someone who is great at drawing realistic portraits is not necessarily, in fact more than likely not at all, able to do effective caricatures. Caricature is a specialty art form which can be done by very few artists, not a "lower" art form that can be done by just any artist. Don't be duped into thinking simplicity is easier than complexity. Most artist slowly build up their drawings. Caricature requires an unusual ability to be extremely concise. It also requires a sense of humor which will be considered funny not just by the artist and a few of his or her friends, but by a near-universal viewership. Publication in a national magazine tends to lend credence to this unusual ability.